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Diversity Curriculum

Early Childhood - Elementary Education - Elementary MAT - English - History - Math - Math MAT

This is a list of sample diversity curriculum and programs maintained by individual programs or departments.

Early Childhood B.A.

ECED 301 is the first course our candidates take upon admission into our undergraduate program. This course provides a range of methods for writing and teaching lessons and also includes information for the candidates on Universal Design for Learning, Teaching Tolerance, differentiated instruction, academic and cultural diversity, learning styles, multiple intelligences, and other issues related to diversity.

ECED 419 is usually taken concurrently with ECED 301 and focuses on early care and education of children from birth to three.  It includes a practica working with infants and toddlers, a case study and journal log, a visit and workshop at Prevent Child Abuse Rhode Island  and a workshop on early intervention, IFSP's and IEP's.

ECED 423 is the first required Developmental Literacy and Language Arts course and also includes information about young children's literature.  The focus is on promoting literacy and the other four language arts with children with different literacy and language arts needs from kindergarten through grade two from diverse cultural backgrounds. It includes a practica working with first graders in a rural school and a suburban school that has a diverse student group. Attention is given to working with  students with diverse literacy needs including those who are English Language Learners  and communicating about children's development with different types of parents including those who are illiterate, non English speaking, and/or do not have funds to purchase books. The PLP is introduced in this course.
Candidates have several different multicultural literature assignments. To illustrate the importance of using books reflecting children's lives, a short film, Both My Moms Names Are Judy, is shown in which young children say how they wish their kindergarten teachers had used books that included their families.  After a slide presentation on antibias (promoted by NAEYC) books, the candidates plan, implement and reflect on a literacy related antibias lesson using one of the recommended books. They   must also include in their children's literature  bibliography annotated information about  books that they would use to enhance literacy and also awareness of and appreciation of   race, language or immigration, culture,*same sex parented families and disability.  Several different Reserve collections at Adams Library have been established to facilitate these assignments.  This year candidates will also be critiquing Native American Indian picture books for young children. As we have just started a reserve collection of these materials, this professor will bring her own books for the class to utilize after a slide presentation on how to select and use appropriate materials.

Each semester the teacher candidates are given an assignment and extra credit opportunity for their attendance at different diversity events on campus including those during Diversity Week (Oct.), The Promising Practices Conference (Nov.) and the Dialogue on Diversity Spring Lecture. They must write a brief paper explaining what they learned from the event that could enhance their literacy work with young children.

ECED 425 is the second of two Developmental Literacy and Language Arts courses.
Teacher candidates work with infants, toddlers and preschoolers from diverse settings in two private non-profit or sliding fee scale nursery/preschools during the first half of the course and are placed in a variety of individual settings from k-2nd grade for the remainder. Following up on the strong emphasis on literacy and diversity in  ECED 423, the candidates have assignments and discussions  to  reflect on the diversity presented in the staff, families, and young children in each class that they are working with in relation to selecting appropriate literacy related activities, materials, and assessments.  To enhance their work this professor has supplied board books that they can utilize in the first placement including some that are bilingual and multicultural.  The teacher candidates are required to utilize multicultural/antibias materials at least once in each placement. Adapting literacy/language arts activities/instruction for children appropriate for their literacy and language arts development and whose first language is not English is an integral part of the class.  The PLP is studied in more depth in this class. Films are shown to enhance awareness of how to work more effectively with parents with disabilities and the importance of culture/language in young children's literacy development. Each semester the teacher candidates are given an assignment and extra credit opportunity for their attendance at different diversity events on campus including those during Diversity Week (Oct.), The Promising Practices Conference (Nov.) and the Dialogue on Diversity Spring Lecture. Candidates must write a brief paper explaining what they learned from the event that could enhance their literacy work with young children.

Elementary Education B.A.

Diversity is one of the four themes in the FSEHD Conceptual Framework and is a focus throughout the Elementary Education (ELED) program. It is critical for a teacher candidate to come to know and respect the diversity among students who can be found in all of Rhode Island's communities. Throughout the ELED program, the teacher candidate learns about the ways students differ in their approaches to learning. Each candidate learns to consider the needs of students based on the variables of life, whether the needs stem from learning disabilities, racial and ethnic differences, language barriers and/or possible economic disadvantages. It isn't enough for a teacher candidate to learn about these differences through coursework; one of the overarching components of the ELED field experience is the connection between what a candidate learns in coursework and how the candidate applies this knowledge as he plans and teaches in his field placement.

Elementary Education faculty members seek field placements based on the need to provide the teacher candidate with a range of experiences; for example, each ELED 300: Concepts of Teaching candidate creates plans and teaches them in an after-school program in an urban setting. In each ELED course, beginning with ELED 300, the teacher candidate is required to consider the diverse nature of his students as he plans for instruction.

The two courses that follow ELED 300, ELED 422 and ELED 435: Developmental Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School, help develop the candidate's knowledge and skills as they relate to the pedagogy of literacy.  The candidate quickly learns about the multiple reading levels among students found in just one elementary classroom. In the second reading course, ELED 424, the candidate takes a closer look at the variability of reading levels as he conducts a series of assessments. His pre-assessment data helps him make decisions about the strategies and methods needed to differentiate lessons for subsequent instruction. The teacher candidate in ELED 436: Teaching Elementary School Social Studies is required to collaborate with candidates to develop an interdisciplinary unit. The unit must be developed with a series of plans differentiated for the range of learners in the class.

Both the science and mathematics methods courses, ELED 437 and ELED 438 require each candidate to plan multiple assessments, from preassessment to summative assessment. The preassessments must be completed and analyzed before the candidate plans the unit. The preassessment data informs the candidate of how to think about planning the unit. He creates a chart that includes unit objectives, assessments for meeting unit objectives and adaptations based on the preassessment data.

The assessments conducted during the mathematics and science methods courses are precursory activities for the student-teaching experience. The teacher candidate is required to complete a Teacher Candidate Work Sample, an all-encompassing assignment that includes multiple assessments. The candidate uses the data to gain information about what students know and are able to do. This data will also help the candidate make decisions about ways to differentiate lessons for all learners in the classroom.

Elementary MAT

Diversity is one of the four themes in the FSEHD Conceptual Framework, and as such, is a focus throughout the ELED MAT program. Every course includes attention to diversity and addressing the learning needs of all students, including students from different racial and ethnic minority groups, English Language Learners, students with disabilities, and economically disadvantaged students. Candidates learn about strategies and techniques for promoting learning of all students, construct and teach lessons that include modifications and accommodations to address learning needs of individuals, and are involved in many field experiences that provide them with access to a wide range of children with diverse needs. Some program courses are more heavily weighted in instructing candidates about diversity in schools and how to address learning needs, including CEP 552 Psychological Perspectives on Learning and Teaching, where Response To Intervention (RTI) in a major focus. Also, FNED 546 Contexts of Schooling requires candidates to read extensively about experiences of children who represent different racial and ethnic minority groups. They participate in a service learning project in an urban setting, the purpose of which is to give candidates the opportunity to explore first-hand the impact of socio-cultural forces, school expectations, and institutional arrangements on students. SPED 531 Universal Design for Educating All Students provides a foundation for understanding and instructing children and youth with disabilities, and candidates are required to develop a differentiated unit of instruction to demonstrate their ability to apply the content of the course. During the practicum methods courses, ELED 538 Mathematics MAT Practicum, ELED 537 Science MAT Practicum, and ELED 524 Developmental Reading MAT Practicum II, candidates construct and implement lessons, applying instructional models, techniques, and strategies that meet student needs and promote learning. During ELED 528 Social Studies in the Elementary School, candidates construct a thematic unit that is keyed to the National Council for the Social Studies Standards and/or those standards developed by the appropriate professional organizations in History, Civics, Economics and Geography. Diversity is addressed through the requirement that the unit must be approached from at least two perspectives that might include gender, class, ethnic or racial views, and when possible, attend to democratic values such as justice, freedom, equality and equity. The focus on diversity continues during the student teaching component of their programs, and candidates are specifically assessed with respect to their ability to address the diverse learning needs represented in their placements.

English B.A. and English MAT

The English teacher candidate is introduced to the significance of unequal educational outcomes and the importance of addressing the needs of all students from their very first class in the professional sequence. That understanding is a cornerstone of the program, and as candidates progress through their professional sequence, they deepen and build upon this understanding. They explore ways to better meet the needs of all students in schools, develop and teach lessons that have this as a central objective, and reflect upon their successes and challenges as they continue to adapt their lessons.

FNED 346: Schooling in a Democratic Society. The course examines the historical roots of inequality in U.S. society, how schools have contributed to unequal outcomes, and how educators can work to ensure that all students have opportunities to succeed in schools.

Catalog Description, FNED 346: The social and cultural forces that affect schools are examined.  Fifteen hours of field-based experience is required.

Candidates, as part of their experience, spend 15 + hours tutoring in urban diverse schools.  They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, InfoWorks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) for the schools and communities in which they will be tutoring in order to better understand their students. Candidates are asked to reflect, journal, and blog on their readings and classroom experiences, and to relate what they are learning in the classroom to what they are observing and experiencing in the schools. Educational practices that address the needs of all students are examined through readings, films, school experiences etc. Candidates also attend Promising Practices, a conference for educators and teacher candidates held annually at Rhode Island College, which offers a keynote speaker, workshops, and a media and curriculum fair that focus on making schools and teachers more responsive to the needs of all students.

RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool. FNED 346 instructors are piloting the introduction and integration of aspects of the RITER-funded Cultural Competency Assessment Tool, developed by participants from all universities in RI with teacher preparation programs, into their classes. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool, used for formative purposes, is intended to assist the candidate in understanding, developing, and ultimately practicing what constitutes culturally competent teaching.

This formative instrument was designed as a means of assessing whether the teacher candidate … is able to incorporate culturally competent teaching practices into his or her teaching experience…. The instrument is broken down into five areas or categories (Planning and Instruction; Assessment; Professional Behavior; Collaboration; Communication).  These categories have been generally accepted by researchers and supervising practitioners as embodying the scope of culturally competent teaching.  The term “sociocultural” is used to represent differences in ethnicity, race, gender, class, language, ability, sexual orientation, social class and religion. (RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool)

SED 406: Instructional Methods, Design and Technology. Teacher candidates are introduced to basic lesson planning and design, and in the process examine educational practices that address the needs of diverse learners. Topics include:  Universal Design for Learning, building community in the classroom, RIPTS, and the use of technology to maximize learning. Candidates also spend four hours observing expert teachers in their field in two different settings, one of which is ideally in an urban or urban-ring setting.
SED 407: Instructional Methods, Design and Literacy. Several of the course outcomes specifically address aspects of diversity.  For instance:

  • Develop lesson plans that … engage all learners, scaffold and differentiate instruction, incorporate student interests and literacy practices, assess student learning in multiple ways…
  • (Implement two lesson plans that) draw upon students' funds of knowledge and literacy practices to engage in academic learning in meaningful and authentic ways.
  • Explore current political and philosophical issues surrounding secondary schools, teachers and students.

Course topics/themes relevant to diversity include Differentiated Instruction; English Language Learners' needs and abilities; and Multiple Forms of Assessment. Candidates spend 10 hours in public school classrooms, observing initially and then teaching the two literacy-based lessons—one reading and one writing--they developed.  Candidates' lessons are differentiated and engaging according to best practices and address GLE's/GSE's and WIDA standards. In terms of specific groups, this includes:

Students from different racial and ethnic minority groups

Instructional strategies discussed in terms of diverse cultural practices and values.
Different language practices discussed in relation to reading and writing of texts and classroom discourse practices.
Students address these issues in lesson plans and in reflective writings.
Strength-based (aka “assets-based”) perspective on home culture.

English Language Learners

Concepts of BICS & CALP in relation to literacy teaching and learning and classroom discourse. Instructional strategies for promoting English language use, combined with a strength-based approach to L1.

Students with disabilities

Strength-based perspective taught in relation to assessment issues; concept of differentiated instruction, differentiated texts, vocabulary instruction (with focus on SPED 433 as providing in-depth knowledge and practice).

Economically disadvantaged students 

Relations between language and social class are discussed; distinction between everyday and academic language and discourse. Students assigned to use this distinction in writing up observations of students' oral and written discourse.

SED 411: Content and Pedagogy In Secondary Education and SED 412: Field Practicum In Secondary Education (Formerly SED 410)

SED 411: Students examine principles, methods, content, and curriculum in the content area and prepare lessons and units that incorporate the needs of diverse learners and effective assessment strategies.
SED 412: Teacher candidates, under the supervision of college and cooperating instructors, plan, develop, and implement lesson plans within middle/secondary cooperating settings, drawing on content developed in SED 411.

Objectives and Assignments. Several objectives and assignments address aspects of teaching with diverse populations in mind:

Objectives.  Candidates will:

Readings/Resources

Assessments

Standards/Conceptual Framework

Create a student learning inventory that addresses students' self-identified strengths, weaknesses, and preferences when it comes to learning, literacy and English; and their cultural and social experiences.

Samples

Student Learning Inventory (formative); future lesson plans (summative)

RIPTS 3, 4, 8; NCTE 2.1, 3.7, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4; Knowledge, Diversity, Pedagogy

Develop an understanding of current definitions of literacies and discourses, and how these impact learning environments and individuals.

Power Point; NCTE position statement

Class discussion; in-class writing (formative); future lesson plans (summative)

RIPTS 1, 5; NCTE 2.1, 2.2, 2.5, 3.7, 4.3, 4.4; Knowledge, Diversity, Pedagogy

Apply culturally responsive and social justice-oriented discourses to their work with kids and teaching.

Kohl; WIDA standards; Christensen 1-11; chapter 1; Teaching Tolerance articles;

Class discussion (formative); future lesson plans (summative)

RIPTS 1, 3, 4, 5; NCTE 2.1, 2.2, 2.5, 3.7, 4.3, 4.4; Diversity, Pedagogy, Professionalism

Develop critical literacy practices as the means for analyzing a myriad of texts, including the canon, multicultural texts, web-based materials, and various forms of media and popular culture.

Atwell 9; Appleman 1,2, 4,5; Christensen 4; Beers handout

Class discussion; practice group lessons; reading log(formative);
mini-TCWS and field-based lessons (summative); critical analysis of media lesson plan (summative)

RIPTS 1,2, 5,8,9; NCTE 2.4, 4.1, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.9; Pedagogy, Diversity

Create a writing assessment (assignment and rubric) that addresses students' funds of knowledge, offers choice, is challenging, and meets state standards

Christensen 2,3, 6, 7; notes from Fletcher and Strong; models

Individual and group practice (formative); Mini-TCWS (summative)

RIPTS 2,3, 4,5 9; NCTE 3.2, 3.4, 4.10; Pedagogy; Diversity

Develop an understanding of how language shapes student experience; particularly in the case of ELL's.

Christensen 5; jigsaw handouts; WIDA standards

Individual and group practice (formative); Mini-TCWS (summative)

RIPTS 1,2,4; NCTE 3.1, 3.2, 4.7; Diversity

Create appropriate and effective learning goals and objectives for a specific, culturally diverse group of students.

TCMWS; models; GLE's; RIPTS; WIDA; NCTE standards

Mini-TCWS (summative)

RIPTS 2, 3, 4,5; NCTE 2.1, 2.6, 4.2;Pedagogy, Diversity

Design an appropriate and effective assessment plan for a specific, culturally diverse group of students that includes differentiation, scaffolding, and frontloading so that all students have opportunities to succeed.

TCMWS; models; GLE's; RIPTS; WIDA; NCTE standards; NCTE Guidelines for “Standards for the Assessment of Reading and Writing”; “What Are Teacher-Made Tests?”

Mini-TCWS (summative)

RIPTS 2, 3, 4, 9; NCTE 2.1, 2.6, 4.4, 4.10; Knowledge, Pedagogy, Diversity

Create an appropriate and effective Design for Instruction (unit plan) for a specific, culturally diverse group of students.

TCMWS; models; GLE's; RIPTS; WIDA; NCTE standards

Mini-TCWS (summative)

RIPTS 2, 3, 4, 6; NCTE 2.1, 2.6, 4.4, 4.10; Knowledge, Pedagogy, Diversity

Field Settings- Candidates are placed in public schools in urban, urban ring, and suburban settings. These settings are diverse in regard to socio-economic status, special needs, racial, ethnic and religious backgrounds, and new immigrant cultures.  In FNED 346, all candidates are placed in urban schools through VIPS, Volunteers in Public Schools.  In SED 406, candidates observe expert teachers in two different settings (i.e., urban and suburban).  In SED 407, candidates are placed with teachers who have content literacy expertise, and these teachers are in diverse schools.  In SED 412, candidates spend 30 hours in an urban high school and 30 hours in a suburban middle school.  For SED 421, candidate placement is determined by a variety of factors, but we place candidates in urban, urban ring, and suburban settings.  While English Education program faculty choose cooperating teachers for SED 412 and SED 421, all placements are made through the Office of Partnerships and Placements (OPP) in the FSEHD, and contacts with the districts, schools, teachers, are made through this office. 

Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample.  As part of their Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample, candidates develop a minimum of three lessons that are assessed (with a rubric) on the following points relevant to meeting the needs of all students:

  • How your lesson differentiates instruction so that all learners are challenged and can succeed, including ELLs, students with disabilities, resistant learners, Gifted and Talented, and students who have diverse learning styles
  • How you plan to assess student learning during and/or following the lesson/task (i.e., formative assessment)
  • Classroom climate: Explain how you will create a supportive learning environment that encourages appropriate standards of behavior, positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation for all students.

Observation and Progress Report. Candidates are formally observed twice by the practicum instructor (once at each site) using the Observation and Progress Report.  The candidate is assessed on his/her ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

************************************************

SED 421/422 Student Teaching and Student Teaching Seminar 

Teacher Candidates continue and expand upon practices and assessments introduced in SED 411/412, including the following objective that explicitly addresses student diversity: 

Present, critique, and improve diagnostic plans of individualizing instruction in response to the social, cultural, behavioral, or economic diversity of the student population

RIPTS 3-5, 7; PAR; Diversity, Pedagogy

TCWS: Contextual Factors; Instructional Decision-making; Reflection

Teacher Candidate Work Sample. Student teachers develop a contextual framework for their student teaching setting, which incorporates the following:

Process 1:  Contextual Factors
The candidate uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning.

  • Demonstrates knowledge of district, community, school, and classroom factors
  • Presents knowledge of characteristics of class members
  • Describes knowledge of students' skills and prior learning
  • Demonstrates knowledge of characteristics of specific students and approaches to differentiate learning
  • Includes implications for instructional planning and assessment

They also assess student learning, and subsequently adapt their lessons to better meet the needs of their students:

Process 5:  Instructional Decision-Making
The candidate uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

  • Rethinks plans for a group of students
  • Modifies plans for a group of students based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for a group of students (re: learning goals & unit objectives)
  • Rethinks plans for an individual student
  • Modifies plans for an individual student based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for an individual student (re: learning goals & unit objectives)

Observation and Progress Report. Student teachers are formally observed at least three times by the college supervisor and three times by their cooperating teacher, using the Observation and Progress Report.  The student teacher is assessed on his/her ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

History B.A., Social Studies B.A., and History MAT

The History Teacher Candidate is introduced to the significance of unequal educational outcomes and the importance of addressing the needs of all students from their very first class in the professional sequence. That understanding is a cornerstone of the program, and as the TC progresses through their professional sequence they deepen and build upon this understanding. They explore ways to better meet the needs of all students in schools, develop and teach lessons that have this as a central objective, and reflect upon their successes and challenges as they continue to adapt their lessons.

FNED 346: Prior to enrollment in the Feinstein School, students take FNED 346: Schooling in a Democratic Society. The course examines the historical roots of inequality in U.S. society, how schools have contributed to unequal outcomes, and how educators can work to ensure that all students have opportunities to succeed in schools.

Catalog Description, FNED 346: The social and cultural forces that affect schools are examined.  Fifteen hours of field-based experience is required.

Students, as part of their experience, spend 15 + hours tutoring in urban diverse schools.  They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, InfoWorks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) for the schools and communities they will be tutoring in, in order to better understand their students. Students are asked to reflect, journal, and blog on their readings and classroom experiences, and to relate what they are learning in the classroom to what they are observing and experiencing in the schools. Educational practices that address the needs of all students are examined through readings, films, school experiences etc. Students also attend Promising Practices, a conference for educators and teacher candidates held annually at Rhode Island College, which offers a keynote speaker, workshops, and a media and curriculum fair that focus on making schools and teachers more responsive to the needs of all students.

RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool. FNED 346 instructors are piloting the introduction and integration of aspects of the RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool (which was developed by a RITER grant and involved participants from all universities in RI with teacher preparation programs) into their classes. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool, which is used for formative purposes, is intended to assist the Teacher Candidate to understand, develop, and ultimately practice what constitutes culturally competent teaching.

This formative instrument was designed as a means of assessing whether the teacher candidate … is able to incorporate culturally competent teaching practices into his or her teaching experience…. The instrument is broken down into five areas or categories (Planning and Instruction; Assessment; ProfessionaRelations between language and social class are discussed; distinction between everyday and academic language and discourse. Students assigned to use this distinction in writing up observations of students' oral and written discourse.

SED 411: Content and Pedagogy In Secondary Education and SED 412: Field Practicum In Secondary Education (Formerly SED 410)

SED 411: Students examine principles, methods, content, and curriculum in the content area and prepare lessons and units that incorporate the needs of diverse learners and effective assessment strategies.
SED 412: Teacher candidates, under the supervision of college and clinical instructors, plan, develop, and implement lesson plans within middle/secondary clinical settings, drawing on content developed in SED 411.

Objectives and Assignments. Several objectives and assignments address aspects of teaching with diverse populations in mind:

  • Select and integrate knowledge from history and the social science disciplines to design lessons (individual, chapter, and unit) appropriate for grades 7-12 in a variety of student populations and school environments. (RIPTS: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3.  NCSS: 1-10. CF:  Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Diversity).  Assessment:  Text Book Assignment, Mini TCWS, and Unit and Lesson Plan Assignment.
  • Identify and adapt a variety of instructional approaches appropriate for different grade levels, ability levels, cultural and language backgrounds, and interest levels as well as for students with different learning needs. (RIPTS: 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.4, 8.1, 8.2, 8.5. CF: Pedagogy and Diversity).  Assessment: Text Book Assignment, Mini TCWS, and Unit and Lesson Plan Assignment.
  • Critique texts in history or the social studies by identifying major themes or emphases, evaluating the appropriateness of the content to various student populations, the adequacy of the data presented, and the appropriateness of the instructional approaches suggested. (RIPTS: 2.1, 2.3, 2.5. CF: Knowledge and Diversity).  Assessment: Text Book Assignment, Mini TCWS, and Unit and Lesson Plan Assignment.

Field Settings. Teacher Candidates spend 6 weeks total (two three-week blocs of time) in two different school settings, one of which is an urban one. Here they design, teach, and reflect on classroom lessons under the guidance of a Practicum Field Instructor and their college professor. They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, InfoWorks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) on the schools and communities they will be working in to better understand their students and the larger community when designing and teaching lessons.

Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample.  As part of their Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample, they develop a minimum of three lessons that are assessed (with a rubric) on the following points relevant to meeting the needs of all students:

  • How your lesson differentiates instruction so that all learners are challenged and can succeed, including ELLs, students with disabilities, resistant learners, Gifted and Talented, and students who have diverse learning styles
  • How you plan to assess student learning during and/or following the lesson/task (i.e., formative assessment)
  • Classroom climate: Explain how you will create a supportive learning environment that encourages appropriate standards of behavior, positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation for all students.

Observation and Progress Report. Teacher Candidates are formally observed twice by the Practicum Instructor (once at each site) using the Observation and Progress Report.  The TC is assessed on his/her ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Exit Interview. An Exit Interview also asks the Teacher Candidate to reflect upon their successes and challenges in meeting the needs of all students.

SED 421/422 Student Teaching and Student Teaching Seminar

Teacher Candidates continue and expand upon practices and assessments introduced in SED 411/412.

Teacher Candidate Work Sample. Student Teachers develop a contextual framework for their student teaching setting, which incorporates the following:

Process 1:  Contextual Factors
The candidate uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning.

  • Demonstrates knowledge of district, community, school, and classroom factors
  • Presents knowledge of characteristics of class members
  • Describes knowledge of students' skills and prior learning
  • Demonstrates knowledge of characteristics of specific students and approaches to differentiate learning
  • Includes implications for instructional planning and assessment.

They also assess student learning, and subsequently adapt their lessons to better meet the needs of their students:

Process 5:  Instructional Decision-Making
The candidate uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

  • Rethinks plans for a group of students
  • Modifies plans for a group of students based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for a group of students (re: learning goals & unit objectives)
  • Rethinks plans for an individual student
  • Modifies plans for an individual student based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for an individual student (re: learning goals & unit objectives)

Observation and Progress Report. Student Teachers are formally observed at least three times by the College Supervisor and three times by their Clinical Supervisor, using the Observation and Progress Report.  The Student Teacher is assessed on their ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Seminar Reflections. Student Teaching Seminar integrates current educational debates into the class discussions and blogs; these typically raise issues around unequal educational outcomes and proposals to address them.

Math B.A.

The mathematics Teacher Candidate is introduced to the significance of unequal educational outcomes and the importance of addressing the needs of all students from their very first class in the professional sequence. That understanding is a cornerstone of the program, and as the teacher candidate progresses through their professional sequence they deepen and build upon this understanding. They explore ways to better meet the needs of all students in schools, develop and teach lessons that have this as a central objective, and reflect upon their successes and challenges as they continue to adapt their lessons.

FNED 346: Prior to enrollment in FSEHD, students take FNED 346: Schooling in a Democratic Society. The course examines the historical roots of inequality in U.S. society, how schools have contributed to unequal outcomes, and how educators can work to ensure that all students have opportunities to succeed in schools.

Catalog Description, FNED 346: The social and cultural forces that affect schools are examined.  Fifteen hours of field-based experience is required.

Students, as part of their experience, spend 15 + hours tutoring in urban diverse schools.  They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, Infoworks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) on the schools and communities they will be tutoring in, in order to better understand their students. Students are asked to reflect, journal, and blog on their readings and classroom experiences, and to relate what they are learning in the classroom to what they are observing and experiencing in the schools. Educational practices that address the needs of all students are examined through readings, films, school experiences etc. Students also attend Promising Practices, a conference for educators and teacher candidates held annually at Rhode Island College, which offers a keynote speaker, workshops, and a media and curriculum fair that focus on making schools and teachers more responsive to the needs of all students.

RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool. FNED 346 instructors are piloting the introduction and integration of aspects of the RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool (which was developed by a RITER grant and involved participants from all universities in RI with teacher preparation programs) into their classes. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool, which is used for formative purposes, is intended to assist the Teacher Candidate to understand, develop, and ultimately practice what constitutes culturally competent teaching.

This formative instrument was designed as a means of assessing whether the teacher candidate … is able to incorporate culturally competent teaching practices into his or her teaching experience…. The instrument is broken down into five areas or categories (Planning and Instruction; Assessment; Professional Behavior; Collaboration; Communication).  These categories have been generally accepted by researchers and clinical practitioners as embodying the scope of culturally competent teaching.  The term “sociocultural” is used to represent differences in ethnicity, race, gender, class, language, ability, sexual orientation, social class and religion. (RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool)
SED 406: Instructional Methods, Design and Technology. Teacher Candidates are introduced to basic lesson planning and design, and in the process examine educational practices that address the needs of diverse learners. Topics for instance include Universal Design for Learning, building community in the classroom, RIPTS, and the use of technology to maximize learning. They also spend 4 hours in their content area observing in two different schools, one of which is ideally in an urban or urban-ring setting.
SED 407: Instructional Methods, Design and Literacy. Several of the course outcomes specifically address aspects of diversity, for instance:

  • Develop lesson plans that … engage all learners, scaffold and differentiate instruction, incorporate student interests and literacy practices, assess student learning in multiple ways…
  • (Implement two lesson plans that) draw upon students' funds of knowledge and literacy practices to engage in academic learning in meaningful and authentic ways.
  • Explore current political and philosophical issues surrounding secondary schools, teachers and students.

Course topics/themes include Differentiated Instruction; English Language Learners' Needs; and Multiple Forms of Assessment. Teacher candidates spend 10 hours in public school classrooms, observing initially and then teaching the two literacy-based lessons they developed. Teacher Candidates identify how their lessons differentiate instruction for all learners, and how they address standards such as WIDA; they also utilize strategies that work effectively with second language learners (addressed in the Zwiers text that students use).

SED 411: Content and Pedagogy In Secondary Education and SED 412: Field Practicum In Secondary Education (Formerly SED 410)

SED 411: Students examine principles, methods, content, and curriculum in the content area and prepare lessons and units that incorporate the needs of diverse learners and effective assessment strategies.
SED 412: Teacher candidates, under the supervision of college and clinical instructors, plan, develop, and implement lesson plans within middle/secondary clinical settings, drawing on content developed in SED 411.

Objectives and Assignments. Several objectives and assignments address aspects of teaching with diverse populations in mind:

Plan lessons and units appropriate for secondary mathematics instruction in a variety of student populations and school environments. (RIPTS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3; FSEHD CF: Knowledge, Pedagogy, Diversity; Assignments: Implemented lesson plan (mini-TCWS), Unit Plan (mini-TCWS).)
Develop a variety of lesson modes that acknowledge different ability levels, cultural and language backgrounds, and interest levels as well as different learning needs and learning styles: formal presentation, investigative lesson, activity or lab lesson, and/or problem solving lesson. (RIPTS 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2; FSEHD CF:  Pedagogy, Diversity; Assignments: Implemented lesson plan (mini-TCWS), Unit Plan (mini-TCWS).)
Develop effective strategies to motivate all students to become involved in learning mathematics. (RIPTS 2.5, 4.2, 5.3, 5.5; FSEHD CF: Knowledge, Diversity; Assignments: Implemented lesson plan (mini-TCWS), Unit Plan (mini-TCWS).)

Field Settings. Teacher Candidates spend about seven weeks total (two periods of approximately 3.5 weeks each) in two different school settings, one middle level and one high school, one of which must be in an urban setting. Here they design, teach, and reflect on classroom lessons under the guidance of a Clinical Instructor and their college Practicum professor. They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, InfoWorks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) on the schools and communities they will be working in to better understand their students and the larger community when designing and teaching lessons.

Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample. As part of their Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample, they develop a minimum of two lessons that are assessed (with a rubric) on the following points relevant to meeting the needs of all students:

  • How your lesson differentiates instruction so that all learners are challenged and can succeed, including ELLs, students with disabilities, resistant learners, Gifted and Talented, and students who have diverse learning styles
  • How you plan to assess student learning during and/or following the lesson/task (i.e., formative assessment)
  • Classroom climate: Explain how you will create a supportive learning environment that encourages appropriate standards of behavior, positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation for all students.

Observation and Progress Report. Teacher Candidates are formally observed twice by the Clinical Instructor and Practicum professor (once at each site) using the Observation and Progress Report.  The TC is assessed on his/her ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Exit Interview. An Exit Interview also asks the Teacher Candidate to reflect upon their successes and challenges in meeting the needs of all students.

SED 421/422 Student Teaching and Student Teaching Seminar 
Teacher Candidates continue and expand upon practices and assessments introduced in SED 411/412.
Teacher Candidate Work Sample. Student Teachers develop a contextual framework for their student teaching setting, which incorporates the following:
Process 1:  Contextual Factors
The candidate uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning.

  • Demonstrates knowledge of district, community, school, and classroom factors
  • Presents knowledge of characteristics of class members
  • Describes knowledge of students' skills and prior learning
  • Demonstrates knowledge of characteristics of specific students and approaches to differentiate learning
  • Includes implications for instructional planning and assessment

They also assess student learning, and subsequently adapt their lessons to better meet the needs of their students:
Process 5:  Instructional Decision-Making
The candidate uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

  • Rethinks plans for a group of students
  • Modifies plans for a group of students based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for a group of students (re: learning goals & unit objectives)
  • Rethinks plans for an individual student
  • Modifies plans for an individual student based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for an individual student (re: learning goals & unit objectives)

Observation and Progress Report. Student Teachers are formally observed at least three times by the College Supervisor and three times by their Cooperating Teacher, using the Observation and Progress Report.  The Student Teacher is assessed on their ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Seminar Reflections. Student Teaching Seminar integrates current educational debates into the class discussions and blogs; these typically raise issues around unequal educational outcomes and proposals to address them.

Math MAT

The mathematics Teacher Candidate is introduced to the significance of unequal educational outcomes and the importance of addressing the needs of all students from their very first class in the professional sequence. That understanding is a cornerstone of the program, and as the teacher candidate progresses through their professional sequence they deepen and build upon this understanding. They explore ways to better meet the needs of all students in schools, develop and teach lessons that have this as a central objective, and reflect upon their successes and challenges as they continue to adapt their lessons.

FNED 546: MAT candidates take FNED 546: Contexts of Schooling. The course examines the historical roots of inequality in U.S. society, how schools have contributed to unequal outcomes, and how educators can work to ensure that all students have opportunities to succeed in schools.

Catalog Description, FNED 546: Integrating classwork and a fifteen-hour field component, students examine the cultural and social forces that affect schools.

Students, as part of their experience, spend 15 + hours tutoring in urban diverse schools.  They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, Infoworks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) on the schools and communities they will be tutoring in, in order to better understand their students. Students are asked to reflect, journal, and blog on their readings and classroom experiences, and to relate what they are learning in the classroom to what they are observing and experiencing in the schools. Educational practices that address the needs of all students are examined through readings, films, school experiences etc. Students also attend Promising Practices, a conference for educators and teacher candidates held annually at Rhode Island College, which offers a keynote speaker, workshops, and a media and curriculum fair that focus on making schools and teachers more responsive to the needs of all students.

RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool. FNED 546 instructors are piloting the introduction and integration of aspects of the RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool (which was developed by a RITER grant and involved participants from all universities in RI with teacher preparation programs) into their classes. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool, which is used for formative purposes, is intended to assist the Teacher Candidate to understand, develop, and ultimately practice what constitutes culturally competent teaching.

This formative instrument was designed as a means of assessing whether the teacher candidate … is able to incorporate culturally competent teaching practices into his or her teaching experience…. The instrument is broken down into five areas or categories (Planning and Instruction; Assessment; Professional Behavior; Collaboration; Communication).  These categories have been generally accepted by researchers and clinical practitioners as embodying the scope of culturally competent teaching.  The term “sociocultural” is used to represent differences in ethnicity, race, gender, class, language, ability, sexual orientation, social class and religion. (RITER Cultural Competency Assessment Tool)
SED 406: Instructional Methods, Design and Technology. Teacher Candidates are introduced to basic lesson planning and design, and in the process examine educational practices that address the needs of diverse learners. Topics for instance include Universal Design for Learning, building community in the classroom, RIPTS, and the use of technology to maximize learning. They also spend 4 hours in their content area observing in two different schools, one of which is ideally in an urban or urban-ring setting.
SED 407: Instructional Methods, Design and Literacy. Several of the course outcomes specifically address aspects of diversity, for instance:

  • Develop lesson plans that … engage all learners, scaffold and differentiate instruction, incorporate student interests and literacy practices, assess student learning in multiple ways…
  • (Implement two lesson plans that) draw upon students' funds of knowledge and literacy practices to engage in academic learning in meaningful and authentic ways.
  • Explore current political and philosophical issues surrounding secondary schools, teachers and students.

Course topics/themes include Differentiated Instruction; English Language Learners' Needs; and Multiple Forms of Assessment. Teacher candidates spend 10 hours in public school classrooms, observing initially and then teaching the two literacy-based lessons they developed. Teacher Candidates identify how their lessons differentiate instruction for all learners, and how they address standards such as WIDA; they also utilize strategies that work effectively with second language learners (addressed in the Zwiers text that students use).

SED 411: Content and Pedagogy In Secondary Education and SED 412: Field Practicum In Secondary Education (Formerly SED 410)

SED 411: Students examine principles, methods, content, and curriculum in the content area and prepare lessons and units that incorporate the needs of diverse learners and effective assessment strategies.
SED 412: Teacher candidates, under the supervision of college and clinical instructors, plan, develop, and implement lesson plans within middle/secondary clinical settings, drawing on content developed in SED 411.

Objectives and Assignments. Several objectives and assignments address aspects of teaching with diverse populations in mind:

Plan lessons and units appropriate for secondary mathematics instruction in a variety of student populations and school environments. (RIPTS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3; FSEHD CF: Knowledge, Pedagogy, Diversity; Assignments: Implemented lesson plan (mini-TCWS), Unit Plan (mini-TCWS).)
Develop a variety of lesson modes that acknowledge different ability levels, cultural and language backgrounds, and interest levels as well as different learning needs and learning styles: formal presentation, investigative lesson, activity or lab lesson, and/or problem solving lesson. (RIPTS 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2; FSEHD CF:  Pedagogy, Diversity; Assignments: Implemented lesson plan (mini-TCWS), Unit Plan (mini-TCWS).)
Develop effective strategies to motivate all students to become involved in learning mathematics. (RIPTS 2.5, 4.2, 5.3, 5.5; FSEHD CF: Knowledge, Diversity; Assignments: Implemented lesson plan (mini-TCWS), Unit Plan (mini-TCWS).)

Field Settings. Teacher Candidates spend about seven weeks total (two periods of approximately 3.5 weeks each) in two different school settings, one middle level and one high school, one of which must be in an urban setting. Here they design, teach, and reflect on classroom lessons under the guidance of a Clinical Instructor and their college Practicum professor. They research data available online (e.g., NECAP scores, InfoWorks data on ELLs, free lunch as a proxy for social class etc.) on the schools and communities they will be working in to better understand their students and the larger community when designing and teaching lessons.

Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample. As part of their Teacher Candidate Mini-Work Sample, they develop a minimum of two lessons that are assessed (with a rubric) on the following points relevant to meeting the needs of all students:

  • How your lesson differentiates instruction so that all learners are challenged and can succeed, including ELLs, students with disabilities, resistant learners, Gifted and Talented, and students who have diverse learning styles
  • How you plan to assess student learning during and/or following the lesson/task (i.e., formative assessment)
  • Classroom climate: Explain how you will create a supportive learning environment that encourages appropriate standards of behavior, positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation for all students.

Observation and Progress Report. Teacher Candidates are formally observed twice by the Clinical Instructor and Practicum professor (once at each site) using the Observation and Progress Report.  The Teacher Candidate is assessed on his/her ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Exit Interview. An Exit Interview also asks the Teacher Candidate to reflect upon their successes and challenges in meeting the needs of all students.

SED 421/422 Student Teaching and Student Teaching Seminar 
Teacher Candidates continue and expand upon practices and assessments introduced in SED 411/412.
Teacher Candidate Work Sample. Student Teachers develop a contextual framework for their student teaching setting, which incorporates the following:
Process 1:  Contextual Factors
The candidate uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning.

  • Demonstrates knowledge of district, community, school, and classroom factors
  • Presents knowledge of characteristics of class members
  • Describes knowledge of students' skills and prior learning
  • Demonstrates knowledge of characteristics of specific students and approaches to differentiate learning
  • Includes implications for instructional planning and assessment

They also assess student learning, and subsequently adapt their lessons to better meet the needs of their students:

Process 5:  Instructional Decision-Making
The candidate uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.
  • Rethinks plans for a group of students
  • Modifies plans for a group of students based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for a group of students (re: learning goals & unit objectives)
  • Rethinks plans for an individual student
  • Modifies plans for an individual student based on analysis of student learning
  • Explains the modifications made for an individual student (re: learning goals & unit objectives)

Observation and Progress Report. Student Teachers are formally observed at least three times by the College Supervisor and three times by their Cooperating Teacher, using the Observation and Progress Report.  The Student Teacher is assessed on their ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

  • The content of the lesson is appropriate for the developmental levels of the students in this class
  • High quality implementation of all indicators (Planning, Action, Reflection): The candidate knows and consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Seminar Reflections. Student Teaching Seminar integrates current educational debates into the class discussions and blogs; these typically raise issues around unequal educational outcomes and proposals to address them.

   
nd consistently demonstrates the methods, skills, and strategies needed to meet students' diverse needs and interests.

Exit Interview. An Exit Interview also asks the Teacher Candidate to reflect upon their successes and challenges in meeting the needs of all students.

SED 421/422 Student Teaching and Student Teaching Seminar 
Teacher Candidates continue and expand upon practices and assessments introduced in SED 411/412.
Teacher Candidate Work Sample. Student Teachers develop a contextual framework for their student teaching setting, which incorporates the following:
Process 1:  Contextual Factors
The candidate uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning.

They also assess student learning, and subsequently adapt their lessons to better meet the needs of their students:

Process 5:  Instructional Decision-Making
The candidate uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

Observation and Progress Report. Student Teachers are formally observed at least three times by the College Supervisor and three times by their Cooperating Teacher, using the Observation and Progress Report.  The Student Teacher is assessed on their ability to design, implement, and reflect upon meeting the needs of diverse students:

Seminar Reflections. Student Teaching Seminar integrates current educational debates into the class discussions and blogs; these typically raise issues around unequal educational outcomes and proposals to address them.