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Additional Evidence Report for Elementary Education - Generalized (B.A.)

This report is designed to include additional information not already included in SPA reports. Begin your program review with the latter.

FIELD EXPERIENCES

 

Course and Description

 

Duration

 

Frequency

 

Field Site

 

District

Number Enrolled

ELED 300: Concepts of Teaching
Candidate plans and implements a six-lesson non-academic unit in an after-school setting. The seventh meeting requires the teacher candidate to connect with the families of the participating students.

7 weeks
15 hours

Weekly

Federal Hill House
Martin Luther King Elem.
Stadium School
Arlington Elementary

 

Providence

 

Cranston

99

ELED 422: Teaching Developmental Reading I
ELED 435: Teaching Language Arts in Elementary School
Candidate plans and implements lessons based on Grade Level Expectations and classroom curriculum.

Courses run concurrently
10-12 weeks
40 hours

Weekly

Charles Fortes
span class="text">Times² Academy
Henry Barnard
Fallon Memorial

Providence


Pawtucket

78

ELED 439: Student Teaching
Candidates manage all responsibilities in an elementary classroom.

15 weeks ELED or 1/2 ELED and 1/2 SPED or Middle Level

Daily

Rhode Island Schools

RIC
Partnership Districts

68

CONSISTENCY OF ASSESSMENT DECISIONS

There are three distinct assessment points in the Elementary Education program; these points occur twice each academic year. The process begins when a future teacher candidate applies to the Elementary Education Program–(1) Admissions. Upon acceptance, the candidate develops plans and teaches in multiple field placements. These teaching and assessment experiences prepare the candidate for student teaching–(2) Preparing to Teach Portfolio.  This portfolio is submitted when the candidate has completed all program course requirements. With an Acceptable or better rating on the Preparing to Teach Portfolio, the teacher candidate is ready for the final phase, the student teaching placement. Throughout the student-teaching experience the candidate plans, teaches and assesses, assuming more responsibilities throughout the semester. The candidate compiles specific work assignments into a culminating portfolio–(3) Exit Portfolio. With the successful completion of the student-teaching experience and an acceptable or better rating on the Exit Portfolio, the Department of Elementary Education Teacher Candidate is ready to apply for teacher certification in the State of Rhode Island.

Admissions
The Department of Elementary Education Admissions Committee meets within days of the application deadlines. The committee members review applications and make decisions based on the criteria set by the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development. The clarity of the FSEHD criteria helps reviewers to consistently apply these measures to all applicants. The Department has an initial admissions checkpoint as applicants drop off applications; they must wait while a quick scan to check for all applications materials is documented. While the scan insures that all pieces are included in the application, there are still some unacceptable applications, due to test scores or GPA's but because of this initial process the Admissions Committee rejects fewer applicants than in previous years. The Admissions Committee's role is to accept or deny based on the FSEHD criteria. Once reviewed, the applications go to the office of the Associate Dean for Teacher Education and letters of acceptance or rejection are emailed to the applicants.

Preparing to Teach Portfolio
Five or six years ago, faculty members collaborated within their content area groups to create one assignment, a course artifact and rubric, which would best represent a teacher candidate's knowledge of pedagogy and competence in teaching. Each content area group designed its artifact in alignment with the RIPTS, the FSEHD Conceptual Framework and the ACEI Standards and, even though these artifact assignments have evolved through the years they continue to provide documentation of the level in which a teacher candidate has met the standards and is progressing towards student teaching.

The Department of Elementary Education holds two faculty meetings each month. The second meeting of each month is generally designed for faculty members to meet within their content area groups. During these meetings faculty members discuss their courses and the implementation and assessment of course artifacts. The conversations help faculty build consistency in their assessment practices. The conversations also play a role in the reasons behind the evolution of any given artifact assignment – the dialogue is similar to what faculty members ask of teacher candidates, "What works and doesn't work?" and, "What could be done to make it better?"

A teacher candidate completes six portfolio artifacts as he moves through the elementary program. It is the compilation of these artifacts that provides the majority of evidence included in the Preparing to Teach Portfolio. The semester before a candidate plans to student teach he is required to submit his Preparing To Teach Portfolio to the Department of Elementary Education. As portfolios are submitted they are grouped according to the candidates' assigned advisors. Then each faculty member reviews the Preparing to Teach Portfolios of their advisees and, if all pieces provide evidence of a candidate's preparedness to student teach, the portfolio is accepted and the candidate moves to his student-teaching placement. If a portfolio is missing pieces or has unacceptable sections, the candidate may be stopped from moving into his student-teaching placement. Since there are many possibilities for incomplete portfolios, the advisor acts quickly to find out what the reasons may be, for example, a candidate who forgets to include a course artifact will have a much different outcome than the candidate who includes an unacceptable rating on a course artifact.

Exit Portfolio

The final phase of the program includes the full semester of student teaching and an associated seminar. Candidates complete a comprehensive Teacher Candidate Work Sample (TCWS) that is assessed by the cooperating teacher.  During the 2009-2010 academic year, the FSEHD Director of Assessment held meetings for cooperating teachers to facilitate consistency in scoring this assessment. Candidates are also observed three times by both their Cooperating Teacher and College Supervisor who complete a Teacher Candidate Observation and Progress Report (TCOPR) to assess their progress.

DIVERSITY

Diversity is one of the four themes in the FSEHD Conceptual Framework and is a focus throughout the Elementary Education (ELED) program. It is critical for a teacher candidate to come to know and respect the diversity among students who can be found in all of Rhode Island's communities. Throughout the ELED program, the teacher candidate learns about the ways students differ in their approaches to learning. Each candidate learns to consider the needs of students based on the variables of life, whether the needs stem from learning disabilities, racial and ethnic differences, language barriers and/or possible economic disadvantages. It isn't enough for a teacher candidate to learn about these differences through coursework; one of the overarching components of the ELED field experience is the connection between what a candidate learns in coursework and how the candidate applies this knowledge as he plans and teaches in his field placement.

Elementary Education faculty members seek field placements based on the need to provide the teacher candidate with a range of experiences; for example, each ELED 300: Concepts of Teaching candidate creates plans and teaches them in an after-school program in an urban setting. In each ELED course, beginning with ELED 300, the teacher candidate is required to consider the diverse nature of his students as he plans for instruction.

The two courses that follow ELED 300, ELED 422 and ELED 435: Developmental Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School, help develop the candidate's knowledge and skills as they relate to the pedagogy of literacy.  The candidate quickly learns about the multiple reading levels among students found in just one elementary classroom. In the second reading course, ELED 424, the candidate takes a closer look at the variability of reading levels as he conducts a series of assessments. His pre-assessment data helps him make decisions about the strategies and methods needed to differentiate lessons for subsequent instruction. The teacher candidate in ELED 436: Teaching Elementary School Social Studies is required to collaborate with candidates to develop an interdisciplinary unit. The unit must be developed with a series of plans differentiated for the range of learners in the class.

Both the science and mathematics methods courses, ELED 437 and ELED 438 require each candidate to plan multiple assessments, from preassessment to summative assessment. The preassessments must be completed and analyzed before the candidate plans the unit. The preassessment data informs the candidate of how to think about planning the unit. He creates a chart that includes unit objectives, assessments for meeting unit objectives and adaptations based on the preassessment data.

The assessments conducted during the mathematics and science methods courses are precursory activities for the student-teaching experience. The teacher candidate is required to complete a Teacher Candidate Work Sample, an all-encompassing assignment that includes multiple assessments. The candidate uses the data to gain information about what students know and are able to do. This data will also help the candidate make decisions about ways to differentiate lessons for all learners in the classroom.

TECHNOLOGY

One of the Elementary Education admissions requirements is that an applicant be proficient in the use of technology. Each applicant must provide documentation of the successful completion of the FSEHD Technology Competency Requirement. This requirement can be met in one of two ways, through a technology exam or a three-credit course, both offered only at RIC. The successful completion of this requirement provides evidence of the applicant's ability to use technology and therefore, his readiness to learn about its integration into instruction.

The ELED course instructors share the expectations that each candidate will use technology to accomplish course requirements, in coursework and field experiences. Most ELED course instructors use Blackboard® as a means of communication and instruction. In addition, several of the courses are held in the STEM Center classrooms, which are equipped with state-of-the-art technology.

Each STEM Center classroom includes:

  • Dual projection (or monitors)
  • Sound reinforcement and program audio
  • Wireless microphone
  • DVD/VCR playback
  • Lectern or desk with fold-out shelf
  • PC with Sympodium 350 interactive display
  • Laptop and peripheral connections
  • Wireless networking
  • Video conferencing
  • Content capture
  • Document camera
  • Tablet PC/PC cart

Courses regularly held in the Stem Center include the elementary mathematics and science methods courses: ELED 438 and 437. The course instructor's use of equipment during instruction acts not only as an overview of available technology but also as a model of the ways a candidate will/can use technology in his field placement.

In ELED 438: Teaching Elementary School Mathematics, course instructors use document cameras and Smartboards. The candidate has access to a laptop (from the cart) and is able to collaborate with peers to search for lesson ideas and plan for instruction. Most class time the teacher candidate is engaged in a variety of activities. The candidate explores mathematics concepts and shares ideas using the available technology; the course instructors believe this hands-on approach to solving problems and sharing ideas via the document camera helps extend the candidate's knowledge of pedagogy and also builds confidence in the candidate's ability to integrate this technology into instruction once in the field.

ELED 437: Teaching Elementary School Science is the course most heavily weighted in technology. The ELED teacher candidate uses the following tools during the course:

  • Blackboard Learning Management System-to access course materials, share ideas individually and small groups, submit assignments, and receive feedback/grades.
  • Chalk and Wire Assessment Management System (C&W): Teacher candidate purchases a subscription to C&W, develops e-course portfolio and uploads the “Preparing to Teach” portfolio artifact.
  • Web browsers - accesses readings and other resources
  • e-mail
  • Scanner and digital camera for completing a Chalk and Wire course portfolio, preparing lesson materials.
  • Classroom laptops
  • Classroom response system
  • Video-conferencing equipment

One class session is devoted to the integration of technology into instruction. The candidate is introduced to the ISTE standards, browses web sites, views video clips, and reflects on the prospects of using these “emerging” technologies for 21st Century classrooms:

  • Digital microscopy
  • Probeware for digital data collection
  • Online video streaming
  • Interactive simulations
  • Interactive white board (smart board)
  • Digital photography (pocket-sized camcorders)

Finally, at field placement site, the teacher candidate has the opportunity to use the following:

  • Document camera
  • Tablet PCs
  • Connectivity to Internet
  • Digital projector
  • Scanner/printer
  • Video streaming (Discovery Education)
  • Classroom response system (i>clickers.com)
  • PowerPoint

As a result, the candidate is well prepared to use technology to enhance instruction, when the technology is available, during the final phase of the program, student teaching. In addition, technology use is assessed in the unit wide FSEHD Teacher Candidate Work Sample and the FSEHD Observation Report.

OTHER

Dr. James Barton
For more than 20 years Dr. Barton has been collaboratively consulting with teachers in the following Rhode Island school districts: Providence, Pawtucket, Lincoln, Warwick, Cranston, Coventry, Exeter/West Greenwich, Chariho, Block Island and Little Compton.

Dr. Jennifer Duerr
Dr. Duerr has two publications currently in press.
Literacy Lessons to Help Kids Get Fit and Healthy: Scholastic, NY. (in press).
Betting on Theory for a Win-Win: Poker and Literature Discussion Groups, Journal of Reading, (in press).

Dr. Anne Goodrow
Dr. Goodrow is the Co-Principal Investigator on the Teaching and Learning Multiplication Through Lesson Study Project, which includes 27 teachers in grades K-8, in East Providence and Cumberland, RI (2010).

Dr. Goodrow is a Fellow in the Education Alliance at Brown University. She participates in Project BRITE (Brown's Response to Improving Teacher Education in Rhode Island), which has as its goal, to aid higher education faculty in preparing new teachers to address the language and literacy needs of English language learners (2010).

Dr. Goodrow facilitates a series of NCTM e-workshops offered for mathematics teachers in Rhode Island and sponsored by the RI STEM Center in conjunction with the Rhode Island Mathematics Teachers Association (2010).

Dr. Goodrow is collaborating in the planning of the RI STEM Conference, noted in RI's Race To The Top proposal and scheduled for May 6, 2011 at RIC.

Dr. Goodrow presented at Rhode Island College's Promising Practices Conference. She shared classroom-based research about teaching mathematics to students in grade 4 (November, 2010).

Dr. Elizabeth Henshaw
Dr. Henshaw presented two papers in 2009 and 2010.
Henshaw, E. (2010). The Effect of Educational philosophy on Teaching and Learning in a Culturally Diverse Classroom. Presented at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

Henshaw, E. & McGuire-Schwartz, M.E. (2009, February) Culturally responsive education: Preparing pre-service teachers to understand and learn about different cultures and values to gain perspective of the global community. Paper presented at the Association of Teacher Educators Conference, Dallas, TX.

Dr. Henshaw coordinated an effort by a small group of ELED 436: Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School teacher candidates to create a simulation lesson: Immigration into USA through Ellis Island. The simulation lesson was created for fifth-grade students at Mary Fogarty Elementary School, South Providence, RI. Use link to view project–http://dl.dropbox.com/u/12653951/Ellis%20Island.ppt

Dr. Martha Horn
Dr. Horn is the 2010 recipient of the Rhode Island College Honor Roll Award.
Dr. Horn was a featured presenter at the Literacy for All Conference, Providence RI, 2010. Paper presented: Listening to Our Students as a Way to Help the Writing Improve.
Dr. Horn was a featured speaker at University of Texas Writing Project, November 2008. Paper presented: Talking, Drawing, Writing in the Primary Writing Classroom.

Dr. MacGregor Kniseley
Dr. Kniseley published, I>clicker Pedagogy Case Study: Clickers in Elementary Classrooms (2009).
http://www.iclicker.com/dnn/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=7nfqA6ju5ys%3D&tabid=168

Dr. Maria Lawrence
Since 2004, Dr. Lawrence has been a member of the Sherlock Center on disabilities Universal Design for Learning Workgroup comprised of higher education faculty (URI and RIC). The Center is dedicated to research and advocation of UDL in pre-K-16 education. Presentations on UDL include, USA and international conferences and professional development offerings to educators.  Curriculum project and related resources developed by the workgroup can be found online, http://www.ric.edu/sherlockcenter/udl.html

Dr. Lawrence is the Coordinator of the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance (2005–2010).

Dr. Lawrence is a Board Member and Board President Nuweetooun School at Tomaquag Indian Memorial Museum. TIMM is an educational non-profit 501c3 organization. Support fundraising activities, curricular design, and exhibit development. (2008-2010).

Dr. Lawrence is a consultant with the Southern New England Tribal Youth Science Initiative Project–Grades 6-12. This initiative project engages Native youth, from regional (RI, MA) schools, in informal science education programming.

Dr. Corinne McKamey
Dr. McKamey received the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award, Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College (2009-2010).
Program Focus:  Behavioral research training on variations in child and adolescent development e.g. how variations in race and ethnicity, gender and social class interact with risk and resiliency factors in human development.
Program Aim:  Enable novice scholars to launch independent research careers through external funding.

Dr. McKamey earned two publications and presented at three conferences.

Bernard, R., C. Cervoni, C. Desir, & C. McKamey (2010). Understanding the “I” in the Academy in Luttrell, W., ed. Qualitative Research in Education Reader.  New York:  Routledge.

Porche, M., C. McKamey & P. Wong (2009). Positive Influences of Education and Recruitment on Aspirations of High School Girls to Study Engineering in College.  American Society for Engineering Education.  Published conference Proceedings from the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Engineering Education, Austin Texas.

McKamey, C. (2010). Making Washington High like you: a case study of an immigrant high school student's identity formation.  Narrative Matters Conference, Fredericton Canada.

McKamey, C. & M. Porche (2010). “We mixed and stirred,” and “that excited me!”  Collective and individual identity formation in urban high school science labs,” Society for Research on Adolescents Conference, Philadelphia PA.

Charmaraman, L. & C. McKamey (2010). Urban middle school youth's perspectives on relationships: a visual and textual analysis, Society for Research on Adolescents Conference, Philadelphia PA

Dr. Madeline Nixon
Dr. Nixon is the faculty advisor for the Rhode Island College Sorority, Zeta Xi Delta (2008-2010).
Dr. Nixon is on the Committee to produce a statewide Poetry Anthology written by children in grades K-12 (2007-2010).

   
orkgroup comprised of higher education faculty (URI and RIC). The Center is dedicated to research and advocation of UDL in pre-K-16 education. Presentations on UDL include, USA and international conferences and professional development offerings to educators.  Curriculum project and related resources developed by the workgroup can be found online, http://www.ric.edu/sherlockcenter/udl.html

Dr. Lawrence is the Coordinator of the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance (2005–2010).

Dr. Lawrence is a Board Member and Board President Nuweetooun School at Tomaquag Indian Memorial Museum. TIMM is an educational non-profit 501c3 organization. Support fundraising activities, curricular design, and exhibit development. (2008-2010).

Dr. Lawrence is a consultant with the Southern New England Tribal Youth Science Initiative Project–Grades 6-12. This initiative project engages Native youth, from regional (RI, MA) schools, in informal science education programming.

Dr. Corinne McKamey
Dr. McKamey received the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award, Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College (2009-2010).
Program Focus:  Behavioral research training on variations in child and adolescent development e.g. how variations in race and ethnicity, gender and social class interact with risk and resiliency factors in human development.
Program Aim:  Enable novice scholars to launch independent research careers through external funding.

Dr. McKamey earned two publications and presented at three conferences.

Bernard, R., C. Cervoni, C. Desir, & C. McKamey (2010). Understanding the “I” in the Academy in Luttrell, W., ed. Qualitative Research in Education Reader.  New York:  Routledge.

Porche, M., C. McKamey & P. Wong (2009). Positive Influences of Education and Recruitment on Aspirations of High School Girls to Study Engineering in College.  American Society for Engineering Education.  Published conference Proceedings from the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Engineering Education, Austin Texas.

McKamey, C. (2010). Making Washington High like you: a case study of an immigrant high school student's identity formation.  Narrative Matters Conference, Fredericton Canada.

McKamey, C. & M. Porche (2010). “We mixed and stirred,” and “that excited me!”  Collective and individual identity formation in urban high school science labs,” Society for Research on Adolescents Conference, Philadelphia PA.

Charmaraman, L. & C. McKamey (2010). Urban middle school youth's perspectives on relationships: a visual and textual analysis, Society for Research on Adolescents Conference, Philadelphia PA

Dr. Madeline Nixon
Dr. Nixon is the faculty advisor for the Rhode Island College Sorority, Zeta Xi Delta (2008-2010).
Dr. Nixon is on the Committee to produce a statewide Poetry Anthology written by children in grades K-12 (2007-2010).